Grains and Starches

Buckwheat: a viable grain-free pet food ingredient?

Data on its nutritional health for pets is scarce, but buckwheat may be worth the research to determine its viability as a novel pet food ingredient.
In this era of grain-free, novel and exotic ingredient-containing foods, is there a nutritional or processing reason that buckwheat remains relatively obscure to the pet food market?
Read More

Alfalfa: A smart choice for dog and cat food?

Alfalfa is found in a number of cat and dog foods, but its safety and nutritional benefits are still being debated.
The use of alfalfa in some dog and cat foods has created questions with consumers—specifically, whether alfalfa is an ingredient that belongs in these foods. Unfortunately, there isn't a compelling or definitive answer for the petfood company, veterinarian or pet owner.
Read More

Ancient grains for today’s petfood: Amaranth and quinoa

While not mainstream petfood ingredients, these pseudo-cereals may be viable alternatives for specialty purposes
As more and more petfood brands strive for differentiation, the search for non-traditional ingredients intensifies. We have seen new meats and meals, tubers in many varieties and now legume seeds and beans becoming prominent.
Read More

Tapioca: A novel starch source for petfood

This ingredient has become especially prevalent in no-grain and elimination diets
In the search for more novel ingredients to use in petfood, a new starch source, tapioca, has begun to find its way into some specialty foods. This ingredient has become especially prevalent in no-grain and “elimination” diets.
Read More

Why is rye rarely used in petfood?

There are no substantial technical, nutritional or performance issues associated with rye that would limit its use for pets
Rye is a fairly common ingredient in human foods and beverages. The most prevalent occurrence is in crackers and breads. Be it a light American rye, a dark German rye, heavy whole-grain pumpernickel rye or a slightly bitter rye with caraway, rye gets its share of notoriety in baked goods.
Read More

Potato, yam or other?

Sweet potatoes have become the "darling carb" of new products and increasingly popular in specialty petfoods
Sweet potatoes have become the "darling carb" of new products and increasingly popular in specialty petfoods
Read More

Oats

Cheerios for pets?
Oats, as a whole grain, are widely promoted for their benefit to human nutrition and health, especially since the first federally-sanctioned health claim for a manufactured food was granted to makers of oat-rich foods in early 1997. The petfood industry is no stranger to oats; they are a staple in horse feed and a key component in many pet rodent diets.
Read More

Potatoes

Common or novel carb?
Dogs and cats have been eating potatoes for years, if for no other reason than they were leftovers from Sunday dinner. However, the intentional declaration of potatoes as a key ingredient in the pet diet is fairly novel.
Read More

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement