Fibers and Legumes

Could tree nuts be a novel ingredient for pets?

Little research exists on the possibility, but nuts’ nutritional potential might be worth a look for the next generation of pet foods
Little research exists on the possibility, but nuts’ nutritional potential might be worth a look for the next generation of pet foods.
Read More

Pea fiber: a functional petfood ingredient

With a label-friendly name, pea fiber offers an effective, reasonable alternative fiber source for companion animal diets
Pea fiber can be found in an increasing number of petfoods, especially in the premium, holistic and alternative format products. This ingredient is relatively new to petfoods and may be a strategic addition to counteract a growing consumer discontent with beet pulp and an absolute resistance to any of the functional fibers derived from wheat (e.g., bran), corn (corn bran) or soy (soyhulls)—all commonly perceived as cheap fillers. While this impression about the functional utility of these standard fibers is a long way from the truth, it certainly underscores that consumer perception rules the day.
Read More

Peas in petfood

The lowly pea appears to be an effective ingredient for the next generation of dog and cat diets
As petfood companies and pet owners continue to explore a broader range of ingredient options, the lowly pea (Pisum sativum) has been gaining in popularity. Not to be confused with the fresh or succulent green pea, the type that is being used in an ever widening array of applications is dried peas.
Read More

Pulses: new ingredients for petfoods?

With the availability of quality ingredients declining, perhaps we need to explore this category
In the search for new, high quality, raw material sources with consumer appeal and a solid nutritional pedigree, pulses are one class of ingredient that the petfood industry has all but completely overlooked. Is that because of limited availability, poor acceptability by the pet, misperceptions about acceptable ingredients for pets or some other intrinsic nutritional or health issue?
Read More

Functional fiber with color

Tomato pomace has the potential to provide additional nutrition and health benefits
According to the US Department of Agriculture, tomatoes are the second most popular vegetable crop behind potatoes, with an annual average per capita consumption of 71 pounds going into juice, sauce and paste. The backstory is that 10-30% of this is seeds, skin and pulp, with no ready market in the human food aisle. This translates into an estimated 750,000 metric tons of dried tomato pomace potentially available to pet and livestock feed markets.
Read More

Popular Stories