Minerals

Dietary phosphorus sources

This critical dietary element comes from common origins with uncommon names
Phosphorus is an absolutely critical dietary element. Metabolically, it is involved in the structural composition of bone, is a vital part of genetic messaging in phosphodiester linkages of DNA and RNA nucleotides, is involved with transport of energy through high-energy phosphate bonds (ATP), plays a role in systemic acid-base balance and is involved in fat and protein utilization via phospholipids and phosphoproteins.
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Dealing with choline chloride

It's an "Intel inside" type of molecule -- but also a problem child
Dogs and cats, like many other species, require choline. It's the "Intel inside" kind of molecule that allows others to function to their full potential. Almost all commercial petfoods contain supplemental choline, predominantly from choline chloride. However, putting choline chloride into the formula can have profound effects on the way the ingredients are combined and processed during production due to the molecule's hygroscopic (water-loving) nature.Dogs and cats, like many other species, require choline
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Kelp: a viable source of iodine?

Kelp is part of a broader group of seaweeds/algae that have become popular ingredients in dog and cat supplements, home-prepared petfoods, raw petfoods and specialty or boutique petfoods. Despite these benefits, the trace mineral iodine is the ...
Kelp is part of a broader group of seaweeds/algae that have become popular ingredients in dog and cat supplements, home-prepared petfoods, raw petfoods and specialty or boutique petfoods. Despite these benefits, the trace mineral iodine is the main reason for adding kelp. Is it a viable source of iodine?
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Are chelated minerals worth it?

The question is whether they provide additional benefit to the dog or cat
In the petfood industry, inorganic forms of essential trace minerals such as iron, zinc, copper, manganese, iodine and selenium have been the staple. In recent years, though, chelated forms of these minerals have found their way into a number of petfoods. The questions are whether they provide additional benefit to the dog or cat and if they have a place in petfood.
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Salt: what is wrong with it?

Sodium and chloride are considered essential minerals in dog and cat diets
For years, salt had been one of those ingredients in petfood that was so innocuous it had become almost invisible. Recently, though, consumers have been expressing concerns about it. This new attention to salt indicates it has become one of those ingredients with an issue.
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