Vitamins

ARTICLES

Cranberries in dog and cat food: any direct benefit?

Cranberries are being included in many pet foods without issue, but there is very little evidence that they are providing substantial urinary tract benefit.
Cranberries are being included in many pet foods without issue, but there is very little evidence that they are providing substantial urinary tract benefit.
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Lipoic acid: Significant benefits for aging pets?

Cognitive function has not been considered a criterion for evaluating nutrient requirements, but the benefits derived from lipoic acid regarding memory may merit reconsideration.
Cognitive function has not been considered a criterion for evaluating nutrient requirements, but the benefits derived from lipoic acid regarding memory may merit reconsideration.
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Pyridoxine hydrochloride: The stealth vitamin B6

This important pet dietary requirement has gained near-universal market approval
Despite its being synthetically produced predominately by Asian countries with a chemical-sounding name, pyridoxine hydrochloride (a source of vitamin B6) is nearly invisible on popular blame-blogs or safety discussions. This is an important vitamin; it touches nearly every part of animal metabolism and pyridoxine hydrochloride is found on nearly every petfood label around the globe, and yet there is near silence regarding its addition to petfoods.
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The formulator’s dilemma: how processing affects pet nutrition

Better understanding of processing influences allows you to turn the art of nutrient fortification into more of a science
Thermal processing—also known as cooking—of petfoods provides a number of benefits, including convenience, enhanced flavor and texture, improved consistency, pathogen control and decreased spoilage. However, extensive processing can increase variability, destroy essential nutrients and create unwholesome by-products. From a formulator’s perspective, this creates a dilemma regarding how to assure the diet is sufficiently fortified while avoiding excess after accounting for processing effects.
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Niacin: key compound in pets’ metabolism

Also known as vitamin B3, this ingredient is vital for healthy maintenance of pets' nervous tissues, GI tracts and skin functions
Niacin was the third B vitamin to be identified as a dietary essential for its role in treating the deficiency disease “black tongue” in dogs and a disease with a similar etiology, pellagra, in humans. The discovery was tied to pets and humans consuming diets nearly monopolized by grains and deficient in quality proteins.
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