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Pet Food Ingredients
On November 4, 2011

Plasma: thermoplastic gel with pet health benefits

Plasma is a high-quality, natural component that should be considered a valuable part of a dog or cat diet

To the couch potato, the word “plasma” likely conjures up thoughts of a new television; to Trekkies, it’s the high-energy gaseous field the USS Enterprise has to traverse periodically. In other words, the term by itself doesn’t necessarily conjure up a yuck factor. However, some take exception to the use of plasma, specifically animal plasma, in their pets’ food.Okay, maybe the idea is a little yucky—but maybe we’ve become a bit too squeamish. Plasma is the vital fluid component of blood; it is found throughout the body and the medical community even considers it a tissue. In an analogy to milk, plasma is equivalent to whey, which seems to be in all sorts of foods and no one takes issue.To feed our carnivore friends food containing plasma should seem quite natural. After all, those are the very first parts our household predators relish after the kill (or when you open the can). Plasma is a high-quality, natural component that should be considered a valuable part of a dog or cat diet. So, how is it that animal plasma, as an ingredient, gets into a pet’s diet and what role might it play?As a function  of our livestock agriculture and meat production systems around the world, proper slaughter practices dictate that the animal be exsanguinated (to make bloodless). This blood is collected immediately under sanitary conditions in slaughter facilities under regulatory inspection. In the US, this would be under the purview of a licensed veterinarian employed by the Department of Agriculture.Beyond ...

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