Degenerative joint disease, or osteoarthritis, is a significant problem in small animal practice. The disorder affects the quality of life of many cats and can affect the human-animal bond by interfering with activities enjoyed by pets and their owners.

Chondroprotective agents are widely used in both human and veterinary medicine to manage DJD. This study was designed to examine the effects of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate (Glu/CS) supplementation on serum fructosamine concentrations in healthy cats.

Seven cats were treated with oral Glu/CS once daily for three weeks at the manufacturer’s recommended dose. Serum fructosamine was measured before supplementation and at day 22. The mean serum fructosamine concentrations remained within the reference range, and there was no significant difference in serum fructosamine concentrations before and after supplementation.

These findings may improve the confidence of veterinarians in using these chondroprotective agents in cats with diabetes mellitus.

Source : K.T. Davis and K.F. Lunn, 2011. Serum fructosamine in cats receiving an oral chondroprotective agent. Intern J Appl Res Vet Med 9: 52-57.