A lifetime of nutritional support with antioxidants

Sponsored content

cat eating kibble

There is a growing body of evidence demonstrating that antioxidants benefit both man and animals. They manage the damaging impact of free radicals on the body. Appropriate antioxidant nutrition therefore has a role to play in the development of functional pet food products designed for specific life-stages, lifestyles or activity level, and support functionality of food products designed to address specific health or wellbeing concerns.

Read more at dsm.com/anh

 

143 Salmonella cases tied to pig ear dog chews from 3 firms

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration updated its report on its ongoing investigation into Salmonella infections connected to pig ear dog treats.

Read more at petfoodindustry.com 

 

DHAgold supports cognitive function in older dogs

Sponsored content

Chinese style pet food trends

Like humans, dogs are living longer and therefore spend a longer period of life as a senior. With this growth in the ageing dog population, more pet parents are experiencing the strain of having an older dog presenting with a decline in cognitive function. This condition is called Cognitive Dysfunction Syndrome (CDS) and is compared to Alzheimer’s disease in humans.

Read more at dsm.com/anh

 

7 Pet food solutions for companion animal health

Beyond providing nutritionally balanced formulations, pet food manufacturers can help the health of dogs, cats and other pets. Functional ingredients, probiotics and similar additions to a basic diet may provide benefits to pets, such as boosting the immune system or cognitive function. In these seven articles, Petfood Industry covered how companies apply research on companion animal nutrition to new pet products.

Read more at petfoodindustry.com 

 

Sustaining the active canine

Sponsored content

Chinese style pet food trends

Just like human athletes, canine athletes need specialist nutrition, supported by appropriate training to perform at their very best. When considering the active dog, it is easy to think of the extremes, the Greyhound and endurance racing Husky, from which much information on canine nutritional requirements for activity have been generated. Practically, this does bring challenges to dietary design and the need for appropriate interpretation, as the range of activities that dogs participate in is varied; for example, dogs retrieving game in the hunting field, farm herding dogs, military dogs, mountain search and rescue dogs and those taking part in events such as agility.

Read more at dsm.com/anh