Colombian pet market may grow to US$251 million in 2018

The trends driving this growth in the Colombian market reflect those driving the global pet food industry.

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(Quasarphoto, BigStock.com)
(Quasarphoto, BigStock.com)

The Colombian pet food market is booming and has grown in value, volume and price per kilogram during the past few years, said Juan Pablo Garcia, category manager for Nestle Purina Petcare – Colombia, during his presentation at Foro Andino in Bogota, Colombia on November 28, 2018. The trends driving this growth in the Colombian market reflect those driving the global pet food industry.

In 2016, the volume of the Colombian pet food market stood at 28,266 kilograms representing COP739 billion (US$228 million) in value with an average price per kilogram of COP26,260 (US$8.11), according to figures shared by Garcia. A year later, the value had risen to COP791 billion (US$244 million) for 29,110 kilograms selling at COP27,150 (US$8.39) per kilogram.

In 2018, the Colombian pet food market may hit to COP813 billion (US$251 million) in value, which equals an increase of four percent over 2017. The price per kilogram reached COP27,625 (US$8.54).

Trends driving Colombian pet food industry growth

As in many other nations, a growing pet population along with urbanization is creating a greater density of companion animals in Colombian towns and cities, Garcia said. Those pets, especially dogs and cats, are eating more premium pet foods, as their owners increasingly consider the pets to be like children.

An estimated five million dogs live in Colombia, and that population is growing, said Garcia. Between 2011 and 2017 the population grew 11 percent. As people move into cities, they are keeping smaller dogs. Seventy-seven percent of the dogs in Colombia are small breeds. Another 45 percent are medium-sized breeds.

The population of cats in Colombia has grown as well. Now, approximately 2.08 million cats live in Colombia, according to a study by Nielsen and Euromonitor said Garcia.  The cat population grew by 61 percent from 2011 to 2017.

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